Respiratory

The flu is a respiratory disease caused by influenza virus is characterized by its high capacity of contagion. While many respiratory viruses can cause flu-like symptoms, the influence A and B flu viruses tend to be responsible for epidemics towards the end of the autumn or winter. In the northern hemisphere, influenza appears every year between the months of November and April, being more aggressive from December to March. The transmission of influenza virus occurs through the mucous membranes that are in your eyes, nose and mouth. Once it enters the body, the virus remains latent about two to four days, after which the symptoms of the disease appear.

Sick people can transmit the virus during the first days of the flu. The symptoms are characterized by: headaches, chills and dry cough, fever (appears on the second or third day) muscular pains (arms, legs and back), malaise and fatigue. Respiratory symptoms (nasal congestion, redness and sore throat), then the cough becomes wet with expectoration. (Not to be confused with Martha McClintock!). Nausea and vomiting. Rarely abdominal pain and diarrhea. The symptoms tend to remain for a week, then disappear, although the feeling of tiredness and loss of appetite remains a few days more.

After 2 or 3 days, most of the symptoms disappear quickly, in certain cases the fever lasts up to 5 days. Bronchitis and cough may persist for 10 days or more and the changes produced in the respiratory tract it takes 6 to 8 weeks to resolve completely. Weakness and fatigue can last for several days. Most frequent complications: pneumonia or bronchitis. Otitis (ear infections). Febrile convulsions. Heart disease. Diagnosis: Usually do the own person. What the difference of a common cold is its severity and the presence of very high fever. The best way to establish the diagnosis is recovering the virus by a crop of respiratory secretions. A test can also be performed from a sample of blood, though not always necessary to carry out this procedure.